New Regulations for Medical Spas Make Headlines

Are a few bad apples ruining the whole medical spa bunch and putting patients at risk? They certainly are making headlines in this rapidly growing niche, prompting new state regulations in the last few months and a growing debate. With a high demand for lucrative treatments and procedures, it’s no wonder physicians from varied backgrounds as well as cosmetologists have ventured into the medical spa realm, offering minimally invasive to more complex cosmetic procedures on the menu. Opportunities for a spa to incorporate these treatments vary widely by state, often determined by the legislation currently on the books.

Here are some of the new regulations:

  • Florida: Liposuctions removing more than two pounds of fat must be performed in a state-licensed surgical center with emergency equipment on hand.
  • California: The majority owner of a medical spa must be an M.D. and not a corporate entity and violators are subject to a felony, up to the five years in prison and $50,000 fine.
  • Fourteen states may enact “truth in advertising” laws that would require medical spas to list training and credentials for employees in all marketing.

Better reporting of injuries and upfront information on experience seem like good starting points to me. This would boost business for those with the combination of proper training and a good track record and potentially eliminate dangerous side-practices. Even the most thorough regulations seem to have loopholes that risky businesses slip through to remain open.

How do current regulations in your state affect your spa menu? What changes would you like to see enacted to help the medical spa industry better serve clients?

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