The 10 BIG Trends of 2010!

This year, at the Repêchage 12th International Congress for Salon and Spa Professionals in NYC, I was fortunate to share The 10 BIG Trends of 2010! As a skincare industry professional for over three decades, I have seen the ‘latest & greatest,’ come and go. I decided to look into some of the trends I believe have lasting power. And the Big 10 of 2010 are:

  1. The End of Men? Recent studies have shown that women are coming up in the world! Currently, women hold more than 50% of managerial, professional and accounting jobs as well as nearly 50% of banking and insurance jobs. For each two men that complete a B.A. in 2010, three women will do the same. With women increasing their power, it is a great opportunity for spa owners to cater services around the changing lifestyles of these executive women. Create services that multi-task and are results-oriented. Shorter treatments and more targeted treatments are what she will be seeking. The “day at the spa” concept is becoming less and less applicable to women juggling high powered careers and personal life.

  2. But… Don’t Forget the Men! Though women are becoming an increasing power, men are still a big part of the skincare industry! According to ISPA research, men account for 31% of spa patrons in America. Men are increasingly seeking skincare treatments and products. Cater to this client by offering products that are problem solving such as mattifying moisturizers. According to The New York Times, the number of mattifying moisturizers released for men will have increased 56% since 2008.

  3. The New Luxury: Results. Clients are still looking to shell out cash for spa services and products, but they are intent on seeing results! In 2009, the corrective skin care subcategory saw a 6% increase in dollar volume, while the rest of the market saw an overall loss of 4%. If people can see what they are paying for, they will continue to buy it. Share results with clients; show clients a mirror after their treatment and work with them to develop a customized at-home skincare program to continue seeing results.

  4. The New Luxury: Lifestyle Trends. Luxury retailers, such as Hermés, are showing an increase in sales after a long slump. Traditional retailers, including Starbucks and J. Crew, are revamping their images to provide the feel of luxury to appeal to the changing consumer. To keep your salon or spa up-to-date with these changes in trends, it is important not to lack in service or ambiance. Whether you offer facials at $60 or $160, clients will choose the spa with exceptional service and the appearance of the ultimate luxury. Revamp your décor, offer clients added services like an eye treatment with every shampoo; give your clients that “white glove service” they are seeking.

  5. The Staycation” With the travel industry taking a $68 billion hit from 2008 to 2009, according to the US Travel Association, the idea of turning the home into a destination has been on the rise. This creates an amazing opportunity to help your clients turn their homes into a personal getaway by suggesting at-home spa treatments, baths, masks and mood setting candles. Let them take a bit of the spa with them.

  6. What is Green? According to the Daily Green, 98% of green claims are false. While the USDA requires 95% organic ingredients for organic certification, there are no regulations on use of the words “natural,” “herbal,” or “organic” on product labels. By following the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry, found at www.epa.gov, companies can find guidance in creating sustainable products and becoming a part of this greater movement. For salon and spa owners, this brings into question whether “Going Green” is your best business option. In deciding whether to explore this option, figure out what green means to you and your clients. Be authentic to your brand image while being socially conscious.

  7. New Ingredients. The popularization of ingredients based on fads and trends is out the window. Now, ingredients must prove themselves to stand the test of time and to show the results consumers are looking for. Ingredients that will outlast the trends are those that are proven to provide anti-aging effects, to be environmentally friendly, naturally-derived, multipurpose and antioxidant rich. Look out for Green Tea, Beta Carotene and Peptides as the ingredients that fit into these categories! Of course, on of my favorite ingredients is seaweed, stemming from the true European heritage of thalassotherapy. Now that’s lasting power!

  8. Word of Mouth. Though technology is a great means of communication, a recent survey conducted by the Coyle Hospitality Group shows that 74% of clients are most likely to give positive feedback through world of mouth and 56% of clients consider word of mouth extremely trustworthy. Don’t forget your client that is in your door now. She can create positive or negative buzz.

  9. The Power of Touch. Don’t forget that while the world may be so disconnected through technology, when it comes to spa services, clients are looking for that added touch! Especially in tough times, people can easily take their business to competing spas. To retain the clients you already have as well as new clients walking through your doors, go above and beyond to appreciate your clients whether it be through an exceptional facial massage or a handwritten thank you note. It is the personal touch that will keep this client in your hands and in your doors!

  10. Love What You Do! Find your niche. Know what you’re good at and conquer your market. Leading the industry in one category is more noteworthy than following the industry in every category—carve out your specialty and be the expert in your profession. If you love what you do, your clients will love coming back to you!


For more information on Lydia Sarfati, log onto www.LydiaSarfati.com.

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