FDA Approves Botox for Treatment of Forehead Lines

Woman receiving Botox injection on forehead // Photo by wavebreakmedia/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Global pharmaceutical company Allergan has announced the FDA approval of Botox for its third indication, the temporary improvement in the appearance of moderate to severe forehead lines associated with frontalis, or muscle thinning activity in adults. This recent approval makes Botox the first and only neurotoxin specifically geared toward the improvement of three facial treatment areas: crow’s feet, forehead lines, and glabellar lines. “Allergan recognizes that forehead lines are a top area of concern for patients,” says David Nicholson, chief research and development officer at Allergan.

Since the FDA approval of Botox in 2002, it has been the leading neurotoxin brand for esthetic indications in the United States. "Few products have the level of impact that Botox has had on the medical facial aesthetics industry,” said David Moatazedi, senior vice president, U.S. medical esthetics at Allergan. “Botox is the brand that created a new category in facial aesthetics with its first FDA approval 15 years ago. Since then it has continued to be the leading neurotoxin treatment and the world’s number one selling product of its kind,” says Moatezdi.

Botox is approved for use in over 75 countries and is manufactured under strict quality and safety standards. Both the safety and effectiveness have been evaluated in Allergan clinical studies.

To learn more about Botox through Allergan’s newly revamped Brilliant Distinctions client loyalty program, visit www.brilliantdistinctionsprogram.com.

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