5 Ways to Build and Retain a Male Client Base

Industry experts offer their advice on building and retaining a male client base. Photo credit: izusek/Royalty-free/Getty Images

As the stigma of men's grooming and taking care of their skin fades away, more men are concerned about personal care than ever before. In fact, according to a study by Future Market Insights, the men’s intimate care products market is projected to rapidly grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of about 10 between 2020 and 2030. This rising interest in self-care has also led to an increase in male spa clients, although the aesthetic benefits are not necessarily the only driving force. “The other factor driving men to the spa is stress,” says Shannon Esau, CEO and national educator at Rhonda Allison Cosmeceuticals. “Mental health and wellbeing have become a hot topic in our society, and men are finally beginning to realize something their female counterparts discovered long ago: personal care is an essential part of overall health and wellness. More men are turning to the spa as a way to detox a busy mind and rejuvenate.”

We asked industry experts for advice on building and retaining a male client base, and here are some of their wise words:

  1. CATER TO MALE INTERESTS: “Have a gym, sauna, sports massages, offer fitness/health-related treatments, include proper neutral décor and posters/imaging that reflect men having a treatment, create a dedicated section on the menu, carry products made for men with a masculine look, and offer treatments and experiences for couples,” says Christian Jurist, M.D., AMS, FS, medical director of global education at Pevonia International.
  2. KEEP IT SIMPLE: “To retain male clients, it comes down to delivering results and providing an unforgettable experience,” says Shannon Esau, CEO and national educator at Rhonda Allison Cosmeceuticals. “You might also consider getting them set up on a monthly subscription service in which they can get a certain number of treatments each month and product refill every quarter. Get creative! But if you keep it simple, deliver results, and make their skincare automatic, you’ll have a foundation for creating life-long customers.”
  3. COMMUNICATE AND CUSTOMIZE: “Creating facials that are customized for men will help,” says Nicole Landon, national training director at Guinot USA. “Communicate with them and find out exactly why they are visiting the spa. Just like with any client, if you listen and give a customized and easy solution, they will be back.”
  4. BE CREATIVE: “Our biggest tip when trying to retain male customers is to think of innovative ways to invite the client back,” says Serena Slade, business development manager at Moor Spa. “This could be by starting your client on a simple regimen then booking them in for a follow-up service depending on what results you are trying to achieve. Another tip is to connect your clients through your spa’s digital marketing channels, such as your e-mail marketing along with your social media channels.”
  5. ASK FOR FEEDBACK: “Look at the service menu through the eyes of a man,” says Emma Nowakowski, global vice president of education and training at Organic Male OM4. “Have men provide real-time feedback on what they want and use the above approach when making those changes. Make the men’s locker room an area where they want to return to with sports tv, leather sofas, and drink offerings. The ideas could be endless if we change our approach in connecting with what men want.”

For more information on how to attract more male clients into your spa, check out our October 2020 issue.

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